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Teddy Fischer

Teddy Fischer

Today, we wanted to spotlight the story of one of our students, Teddy Fischer, from the perspectives of his father and grandfather. Their intimate insights provide an example of the impact we see young men like Teddy go through with our unique discipleship-focused approach to all male Christian education:

Perspectives from Bill Mann, Teddy's grandfather:

When Covid-19 hit back in March, Teddy Fischer went to online classes and ended up staying with us, his grandparents, for 16 weeks. We live in Pinehurst, about 70 miles from Raleigh. Sis and I got to observe the discipline that Iron Academy instilled in him, from doing his calisthenics to being dedicated by doing his homework when not in class. We watched him grow up before our eyes, both literally and figuratively (he grew at least an inch).  He also developed into a budding entrepreneur when he realized he could sell golf balls retrieved from ponds near our house, and he made close to $400.  His customers loved him, and we loved being able to watch him mature in many ways, not just academically.

Perspectives from Ben Fischer, Teddy's father:

"Teddy previously had a very lukewarm relationship with school.  Something he had to do, but did only half heartedly.  He has always been wholehearted in play—particularly outside vigorous play—and I have always cheered that on as I do believe it is important and good for children to do so.  I remember his dismay at homework in elementary school and a memorable question he posed to me one day in 4th or 5th grade – “Dad, what’s more important, homework or playing outside?"  I confess I had a hard time answering that question, but the spirit of the question was “what is the least I need to do in school to get by?”

From the time he started at Iron Academy as a 6th grader last year, the difference was stark.  He was “all-in” when it came to school.  I got no further questions about how to do the minimum, and he was conscientious about his school work.  He has done the work with a minimum of oversight and involvement from myself or his mother.  He has become increasingly independent and self-motivated.  During the remote learning months this past spring, he was entirely independent and self-directed, living with his grandparents and doing the work on his own.  

I applaud Iron Academy for fostering that sort of personal responsibility.  Now that Iron Academy has Teddy’s attention, I look forward to the ways they will stretch him and help grow his character and faith in the years to come.


"Finally, brothers and sisters, whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable--if anything is excellent or praiseworthy--think about such things." (Philippians 4:8)

"Not that I have already obtained all this, or have already been made perfect, but I press on to take hold of that for which Christ Jesus took hold of me. I press on toward the goal to win the prize for which God has called me heavenward in Christ Jesus." (Philippians 3:13-14)"


If you support our vision of restoring biblical manhood through iron-sharpens-iron discipleship, and our work making stories like that of the Teddy Fischer possible, would you consider becoming an Iron Academy ally by making a needed one-time or monthly donation of $10, $25, $50, or more today?

Thanks to a generous donor, every $1 you donate towards our Tennyson Scholarship will be DOUBLED up to $16,000 until the end of September! We are already almost HALFWAY to our goal! Help us take full advantage of these needed matching grant funds by clicking here to make a donation today.